Tag Archives: fashion

What exactly is a sample room?

Cut And Sewn as many may already know is a traditional sample room based off the classic studio ateliers found in many fashion house brands such as Chanel in Paris, Versace in Milan, and Marc Jacobs in NYC. A Sample Room  is one of the most important stages in the process of fashion manufacturing. In this pivotal moment, design ideas are taken from drawings and turned into the tangible garment. The production room gathers information gathered by the designer, fabric specialist, pattern maker, and manufacturer by which a sample can be made with fullness of accuracy, specification and confirmation.

With our workroom we try to fulfill a variety of important procedures and necessary steps to give way to full on small batch manufacturing. The most significant outcome is to construct a proper sample. With this sample we must understand our client’s requirements for the garment as well as fulfill those requirements as best we can. Once we know that garment is on goal to the client’s desire we utilize the skill operation needed to combine techniques that succeed in the overall performance of an order.

When the plan of action is set we contact the buyer about their bulk production and review production and manufacturing with our sewing team. Cut And Sewn double checks measurement and fabric requirements so as to make perfection in the consumption of purchased fabric. Finally, after constructing a first sample we perfect the pattern and markings which in the end translates across the entire production of future products.  Thus the sample room is the catalyst for ideas into pre-production work before full scale manufacturing.sampleroom

Intern On The Job

Hello!

My name is Nathan Haberthy and I am currently a sophomore student studying Fashion Design at the prestigious Design, Architecture, Art and Planning (DAAP) program at the University of Cincinnati. Cut And Sewn, the atelier manufacturer and sheer force behind this blog, recently hired me at the beginning of 2016 as an intern designer this spring. Therefore I thought it only necessary to introduce myself considering I’ll be one of the many voices to guide up coming posts and fashion news regarding our collection as well as popular brands or industry topics over this spring.

As a fashion enthusiast and beginner in the design field I am always on the hunt for what fulfills the growing hunger of “the new” while holding roots reminiscent of our past. The realm of avant garde tends to abduct my own aesthetic when combined with the glamour that mixes modern with the extravagant couture world.

Besides going on about some of my favorite designers I think it’s interesting to talk about one of my biggest inspirations and how it works accordingly with my other colleagues at Cut And Sewn. The thing that truly opens my eyes not only to pop culture influences as well as fashion telling a story is actually the drag scene. Drag, for those who do not know, is a theatrical art manifestation in the performance realm whereby a man typically dresses up in opposite gender role costume for entertainment purposes. This I find highly interesting considering today it has been capitalized upon in movies and club scenes with flashy costumes and character displays but mainly because history has taught us either through Greeks, Romans, and throughout European past that men were only allowed to play woman roles when telling stories. When looking at the bigger picture, this source of entertainment and creativity, takes fashion to a whole new level by speaking to femininity, storytelling, and turning the average soft good materials into something extraordinary!

How does this tie into my internship!? Easily! The Cut And Sewn team focuses on turning over fashion from old to new and by reversing the process from new to old; in other words transforming classics into modernity and the trending future into vintage pieces. As a designer I am excited about my journey alongside well-grounded individuals who know how to manipulate their ideas into what the public might find attractive. Fashion is a force and can take root anywhere; even from the novelty of drag!

Until next time – Be Bold. Be Inspired,

Nathan at Cut And Sewn

Make It New

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I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for vintage sewing machines. The first machine I ever sewed on was vintage. When I was ten years old, I found one at a yard sale that I bought with my allowance and used throughout my childhood. My friend recently brought this machine to my shop for me to use in my work and it’s quickly becoming a favorite. This vintage machine, made by Kenmore Appliances, will live now in our design room to make samples of new products. IMG_1851

Quiet Company Open House

This past Tuesday, I held an open house at the Cut and Sewn shop, accompanied by a live acoustic show by a family favorite band, Quiet Company, all the way from Austin, Texas. We spent all weekend turning the shop into a presentable space; painting the walls, reorganizing the furniture, and decorating the place. While it wasn’t our “grand opening”, it was so exciting to see so many of our friends and fans of Quiet Company come out to preview the space and enjoy the band. Thanks again to everyone who joined us, and we hope that you’ll come back for the official grand opening in the (hopefully) near future. You can follow Quiet Company here, or listen to their latest album.

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Skube = Skirt + Tube

What is a skube? It’s a skirt plus a tube! Skube.me, owned and designed by Monica Kohler, makes fun, easy to wear tube skirts. The idea behind the skube is versatility; fashion that transitions easily from workout to work day. The skube fits right in poolside just as well as a business casual setting.

Over the past few weeks, we at Cut and Sewn have been happy to be a part of the skube production process, contracted to produce 300 skubes for the Skube.me summer stock. Kohler hand selected a variety of complimenting patterns, then delivered them to Cut and Sewn to be made into the finished product. This kind of access to local small batch manufacturing is what Cut and Sewn is all about. It provides a way for entrepreneurs to have their product made locally and affordably, while allowing us to give close attention to the manufacture of every garment. For the small business, it’s a win win situation.

Skube.me will be showing at Second Sunday on Main throughout the summer, starting this Sunday, June 14. Owner Monica Kohler can also be reached at  monica@skube.me or (513)505-9384 to schedule a pop-up sale or private showing.

Finished Skubes.

Finished skubes

Brightly patterned Skubes.

Brightly patterned skubes

Reversible "urban" skubes

Reversible “urban” skubes

Cut and Sewn Has a New Space!

After years of working out of my home, I’ve finally expanded to a workspace dedicated solely to my business. This exciting change is going to allow me to be more productive than ever. The space that I’m renting will function primarily as a workspace for my interns and I to sew and design, and on special occasions will be open to the public. I plan to open the storefront for Northside’s Second Saturdays, as a gallery and shop for my work and the work of other local artists. It’s been a long process of of moving in and reorganizing, while still trying to get our jobs done, but the place is really starting to get into shape. I am so glad to finally have all the space I need to do my work, and I can’t wait to open to the public!

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Why buy when you can copy…

If I could afford the Comme des Garcons trench (FW/09) I would buy it.  I would buy one in every color and style.  This coat makes me want to cry.

OK, I’m a bit over dramatic but what the hell.  So of course on my student/designer for hire/can I shorten some pants for you salary, I could never afford a coat that would cost more than what I paid for my car. So I headed out to my favorite thrift in search of clothing that could be turned into something resembling the coveted trench.

I lucked out big time.  First I found a short mens trench that was a great color and weight but also had the most amazing brass buttons.  In the women’s section I found a long red and black wool blanket skirt.

I had to take the jacket body and sleeves in quite a bit because they were both really wide. Then I chopped off about 12″ of the length and removed all the buttons, pockets and plackets.  I reattached about 5″ of the length including the original hem to form a really straight, thigh length coat.

Then I draped the skirt around and under the coat until I had an idea about how to cut it.  I used the waste band of the skirt as a scarf around the collar and the fringe from the front of the skirt to trim the lapel and left front.  I trimmed up the rest of the skirt into a rectangle and then cut a square from the center of the cut edge, basically making a horse shoe shape out of it.  Then I took the horse shoe shape by the inside corners and stretched it out so that it formed a straight line at the top with the corners of the original rectangle hanging down all pointy and uneven.  Get it?  Kind of tricky to explain, but it worked!   I sewed the pockets and buttons back on, reattached the lining and tried it on.

I’m happy with it.  It’s not quite as amazing as the original but it is definitely my style, I think it looks like something I would make and wear — it’s more me than the Comme version.  I am tempted to get into my feelings about copying other designers work, which are mixed.  But I’m just not in the mood, I just want to enjoy my new coat and this snowy day.

(Comme pics from Style dot com)